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Machine guarding is part of the principles of Machine safety, although this could be a misnomer: this has nothing to do with the safety of the machines in your plant, it concerns the safety of your personnel that interface with machines during their work. Basically, it achieves its goal by keeping workers out of the danger zone surrounding dangerous machine parts.

Any machine or machine part in your plant that can harm a worker must be safeguarded. Some basic types of hazardous mechanical motions and actions are rotating shafts (including in-running nip points), cutting, pinching, reciprocating, punching, shearing, or bending. An accident is an event that happens by chance or that is without apparent or deliberate cause, removing access to the workers from any of those machine hazards greatly reduces the chance of an accident happening, and reduces the level of injury due to an accident.

The basic steps to safeguard machines in the work environment include:
- Risk assessment, where we determine the level of danger associated with a specific machine:
o how badly can this machine hurt someone,
o are work conditions ripe for this accident to happen?


- Risk reduction: Application of controls, alternatives that can make the machine less dangerous or work practices that can keep the workers safer. Machine guards are part of these choices.

- Selection and application of machine guards that make the area around a dangerous machine safer:
o fixed or adjustable guards.
o presence sensing devices interlocked with personnel gates (such as light barriers),
o access barriers that interlock with the machine power, such as two-hand controls,
o specialized controls (e-stop, safety relay).


One of the original safety standards used for machine safety was EN 954, replaced around 2011 by ISO 13849-1 and IEC 62061. Principles and techniques from these standards provide a guide to achieving machine guarding and safety in a reliable and dependable fashion. Studying some of them will make workers involved in the machine guarding techniques better prepared to do their work.

Next Machine Guarding Applications for Worker Protection Courses
March 13 – 13, 2024 LIVE 2-Way Video Training 8am-4pm Halifax time OR24089 $749.00 + Tax Per Attendee Register
March 27 – 27, 2024 LIVE 2-Way Video Training 8am-4pm Saskatoon time OR24090 $749.00 + Tax Per Attendee Register
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Course topics

I. Introduction to Machine Guarding and Safety

Objective: Understand the fundamental concepts and importance of machine guarding in industrial environments.

II. Risk Assessment in Machine Safety

Objective: Learn how to assess and identify potential risks associated with specific machines and work conditions.

III. Risk Reduction Strategies

Objective: Explore strategies for reducing risks, including the application of controls and alternative safety measures.

View all topics

I. Introduction to Machine Guarding and Safety

Objective: Understand the fundamental concepts and importance of machine guarding in industrial environments.

  • Definition and Purpose of Machine Guarding
  • Distinction Between Machine Safety and Machine Functionality
  • Overview of Hazardous Mechanical Motions and Actions
  • Historical Context and Evolution of Machine Safety Standards

II. Risk Assessment in Machine Safety

Objective: Learn how to assess and identify potential risks associated with specific machines and work conditions.

  • Importance of Risk Assessment in Machine Safety
  • Identifying Machine Hazards
  • Evaluating Likelihood and Severity of Accidents
  • Documentation and Record-Keeping in Risk Assessment

III. Risk Reduction Strategies

Objective: Explore strategies for reducing risks, including the application of controls and alternative safety measures.

  • Application of Engineering Controls
  • Administrative Controls and Work Practices
  • Role of Machine Guards in Risk Reduction
  • Implementation of Alternative Safety Measures

IV. Types of Machine Guards

Objective: Understand the different types of machine guards and their applications in enhancing workplace safety.

  • Fixed and Adjustable Guards
  • Presence Sensing Devices (e.g., Light Barriers)
  • Interlocking Personnel Gates with Safety Devices
  • Two-Hand Controls and Their Significance
  • Emergency Stop (E-stop) and Safety Relays
  • Selection Criteria for Appropriate Machine Guards

V. Safety Standards and Regulations

Objective: Familiarize yourself with key safety standards, their evolution, and their practical application in machine guarding.

  • Overview of EN 954, ISO 13849-1, and IEC 62061
  • Transition from EN 954 to Modern Standards
  • Principles and Techniques in Safety Standards
  • Legal and Regulatory Compliance
  • Impact of Globalization on Safety Standards

VI. Practical Applications of Machine Guarding

Objective: Apply theoretical knowledge to real-world scenarios through case studies and hands-on exercises.

  • Case Studies of Effective Machine Guarding
  • Hands-On Risk Assessment Exercises
  • Utilizing Safety PLCs for Enhanced Safety
  • Simulated Scenarios and Response Strategies

VII. Continuous Improvement and Future Trends

Objective: Explore strategies for ongoing improvement in machine guarding techniques and staying updated on industry trends.

  • Importance of Continuous Learning in Safety
  • Addressing Evolving Safety Standards and Regulations
  • Incorporating Emerging Technologies in Machine Safety
  • Industry Collaboration and Information Sharing

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Next Machine Guarding Applications for Worker Protection Courses

Date City & prov Venue Code
March 13 – 13, 2024 LIVE 2-Way Video AST/GMT-3 Teleconference OR24089 Register
March 27 – 27, 2024 LIVE 2-Way Video MST/GMT-6 Teleconference OR24090 Register
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  • Daniel Chartier

    Years of Experience
    33

    Daniel Chartier travaille comme ingénieur électrique depuis près de 30 ans, et est spécialisé en automatisation et contrôles. Il a travaillé dans des fonderies d'aluminium et les mines, dans l'emballage, les stations de pompage et dans la construction d'usines thermiques (District Cooling) au cours des ans. Il a été responsable du développement de formations de sécurité dans...

    Expertise

     
    • Steve Carnevale, University of Toronto
      Daniel was very informative as well as keeping the guys engaged in conversations regarding real-life scenarios
    • Cameron Dennis, Capital Power Corperation
      Daniel was an excellent instructor and knew what things to go into more detail about.
    • Quintin Fast, Total Power
      Daniel kept the course interesting and did a lot of extra work to make it relatable to our specific field.
    See Daniel Chartier CV

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